Tutorial: Scrapping with Multi-Photo Quick Pages (Part 2)

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As the 275 Photos Challenge continues, I am back today to bring you a second approach to scrapping with multi-photo Quick Pages. Click here to read yesterday’s tutorial about my first and go-to approach – the Drop & Clip Technique!

Please note – all of my tutorials are designed to be used with Adobe Photoshop.  My screenshots are taken from Adobe Photoshop Elements 9 – though any of the newer editions will have the same tools. 

This tutorial uses a Quick Page from the Still Life Collection: White Space 12×12 Album available in my shoppe.

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Scrapping with Multi-Photo Quick Pages: The Photo Mask Set Technique

In most of my Quick Page Albums I offer a coordinating set of photo masks merged into one single file.  This is an optional element that, depending on your comfort and skill level, may or may not be a useful tool for you.

Compared to the Drop & Clip Technique, this approach definitely has more steps and requires more time for the initial organizing, planning and set up of your page.  That being said, the photo mask sets are very handy if you are an experienced photo mask user and prefer the control that photo masks offer.  You may also be drawn to using the photo mask sets if you prefer sizing and cropping your photos separately from the Quick Page.

Let’s get started!

Step 1: Duplicate the Photo Mask Set

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Open both the Quick Page + the coordinating Photo Mask Set for this page. All of the photo masks in the Photo Mask Set are merged as a single file.  Your task is to separate these masks onto cascading, separate layers – one photo mask for each layer.

To do this you will need to duplicate the Photo Mask Set three times.  You may keep a copy of the original merged photo mask set hidden at the bottom of your layers palette, but all of the work will involve the duplicated masks.

Once you have duplicated the Photo Mask Set three times, you will then hide the two bottom layers (sets 2 & 3).  You will now be working with the Duplicate Photo Mask Set 1 layer.

Step 2: Erase Unnecessary Masks

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Our goal in this step is to isolate one photo mask for your first photo.

On the Duplicate Photo Mask Set 1 layer, use the Rectangular Marquee Tool, the Polygonal Lasso Tool OR the Eraser Tool/Magic Eraser Tool to delete/erase masks 2 & 3.

You now have a single photo mask – we’ll call it the target photo mask – ready to process your first photo.

Step 3: Processing Your First Photo with the Photo Mask

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Copy and then paste your first photo onto the layer above the target photo mask. To help with judging the position and size of your photo against the mask, I often temporarily reduce the opacity of the photo.  Once the photo is clipped, hide your original photo layer + the mask layer.  The opacity of your newly clipped photo should always be set at 100%.

Step 4: Moving onto Your Second Photo

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Our goal in this step is to isolate one photo mask for your second photo. At this point you will reveal/unhide the Duplicate Photo Mask Set 2 layer.

On the Duplicate Photo Mask Set 2 layer, use the Rectangular Marquee Tool, the Polygonal Lasso Tool OR the Eraser Tool/Magic Eraser Tool to delete/erase masks 1 & 3. Your first photo will be hiding mask 1, but to avoid confusion you will still need to delete/erase this mask.

You now have a single photo mask (the target photo mask) ready to process your second photo.

Step 5: Processing Your Second Photo with the Photo Mask

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In the same way you processed your first photo above, you will now copy and then paste your second photo onto the layer above the target photo mask.  Once the photo is clipped, hide your original photo layer + the mask layer.

Step 6: Moving onto Your Third Photo

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Our goal in this step is to isolate one photo mask for your third photo. At this point you will reveal/unhide the Duplicate Photo Mask Set 3 layer.

On the Duplicate Photo Mask Set 3 layer, use the Rectangular Marquee Tool, the Polygonal Lasso Tool OR the Eraser Tool/Magic Eraser Tool to delete/erase masks 1 & 2. Your first and second photos will be hiding masks 1 & 2, but to avoid confusion you will still need to delete/erase these masks.

You now have a single photo mask (the target photo mask) ready to process your third photo.

Step 7: Processing Your Third Photo with the Photo Mask

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The same way you processed your first and second photo above, you will now copy and then paste your third photo onto the layer above the target photo mask.  Once the photo is clipped, hide your original photo layer + the mask layer.

Step 8: Merging the Photos to a Single Layer

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The goal of this step is to merge all three of your newly clipped photos onto a single layer so that they can be easily pasted onto the Quick Page file.

In the layers palette, move all three of your newly clipped photos up to the top three layers.  Merge these three layers together to form a single layer.  Use the Rectangular Marquee Tool to select the entire layer of photos (as indicated by the dotted line), then copy.

Step 9: Pasting the Single Layer of Photos + Completing Your Layout

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Paste the single layer of photos onto the layer below the Quick Page.  Since all of the drop shadows are done for you on the Quick Page, your next steps are to add journaling, titles and any additional elements to the layers above the Quick Page.

That’s it!

This tutorial uses a Quick Page with three windows, but you can easily repeat all of these steps to fill in Quick Pages with additional windows. You may also want to challenge yourself to work with the photo masks in the same file as the Quick Page.  Take a look!

The following mini demos use Quick Pages from the Still Life Collection: 10 + 15 + 25 Quick Pages Pack available in my shoppe.

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Using a Quick Page with Five Windows

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After you have pasted the original merged Photo Mask Set of 5 below the Quick Page, your task is to duplicate the original Photo Mask Set five times and work with each layer, one by one, to isolate one photo mask per layer.

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After all of the erasing/deleting this is what you will end up with – a cascading set of photo masks – one for each layer.  While I’ve numbered the photo masks just for this tutorial, I must say this is a great way to keep track of your photo masks while you are scrapping.  It may be worth the extra effort as the windows on the Quick Pages become more numerous.

Using a Quick Page with 10 Photos

A little more effort, but all the same steps. 🙂

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Again, the original merged Photo Mask Set of 10 is pasted below the Quick Page and duplicated 10 times.

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After a lot of the erasing/deleting this is what you will end up with – one photo mask per layer, ready to scrap 10 of your favourite photos.

Quick tip: Once you have set up the photo masks for any page, be sure to save these ready-to-use layered files/templates for future scrapping.

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In the coming months, as we move from 10 to 15 to 25 photos on a page (and so forth), finding your own rhythm & method of scrapping multiple photos on one page will be an important motivational key.  This is a challenge that will not only give you the reward of beautiful pages filled with I-finally-got-these-scrapped photos, but you will also gain a unique set of skills, experience and confidence to use in many of your future projects.

See you back at the 275 Photos Challenge here! 🙂

 

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